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Saxon, Norman and Early English Churches from the Outside Questions

- Could you tell me the typical dimensions of Norman churches? by Geoff Wellens

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Saxon, Norman and Early English Churches from the Outside

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Saxon, Norman and Early English Churches from the Outside by Monique Barb -

Saxon, 600-1066

Only a few Saxon churches still remain today as they were usually made of wood and were replaced in later years by stonebuilt churches. Those that do remain are often simple and square in design having a nave and chancel. They are small churches with walls of rubble, round arches and triangular or rounded windows. The top Photograph shows Earl's Barton Church in Northamptonshire.

Norman 1066-1200

The Normans used massive building methods and constructed walls several metres thick to make up for their lack of knowledge about the principles of construction. Their churches have round arches and small round arched windows. The towers are generally square and stubby and not much higher than the roof of the nave. Some churches have round towers-pa rticularly the churches built for the crusaders. The most characteristic feature of the Norman Church is the deeply recessed doorway with a rounded arch and carved zig-zag mouldings round the surrounds between the door and the arch.

Early English, 1200-1300

The Early English churches were built with thinner walls which were strengthened by buttresses. As a result they are more spacious inside and the impression of height is enhanced by the long narrow windows with the pointed arch which are known as lancet windows. The tower added to the general effect and is usually tall and slender and often capped with a spire. Even so the churches are still relatively plain and simple. On the right is the parish church of Long Sutton in Lincolnshire.

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Saxon, Norman and Early English Churches from the Outside written by Monique Barb for FamousWhy.com
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Saxon, Norman and Early English Churches from the Outside Image Source : wikipedia.org



Tags: saxon, norman, early english, church, northamptonshire



Category: Education  - ( Education Archive)

Date Added: 15 October '07


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